Saturday, May 07, 2005

Introducing the Auracanas


These are 3 of the auracanas, Lauren Beak-all on the left (rust & white), Cherry Blossom behind her, and Cloudy/Heather's posterior facing us. The auracanas we have are not true auracanas, they are often referred to as "easter eggers" or even "Americaunas". The original blood line comes from a Chilean breed that lays green eggs.

Our hens lay variations on green, some the lovely robin's egg pictured below, and other more of a military grey/green. Contrary to popular lore, these eggs are not more healthful than brown or white eggs. Posted by Hello

4 comments:

dreamrequest said...

Sorry, these are not "Auracan" chickens. Please read the following from the Dept. of Animal Science, Okla S. U. "These fowls were discovered in South America. A few were brought to the U.S. but have been crossed with other chickens so much so that characteristics of size, shape, etc., were dispersed. The trait of laying blue or greenish eggs persisted and now breeders are attempting to standardize the physical makeup of the population and gain them recognition as a breed. Some of the Araucanas were rumpless and possessed some interesting ear tufts. Probably at some time in the future, these fowls will be developed into an interesting breed with both economic and ornamental attributes." http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/poultry/

It is not uncommon for another breed, the Ameraucana, to be mistaken for an Araucana. The Ameraucana was developed in the United States in the 1970s in an effort to retain blue egg color in a larger, tailed chicken. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PS013

Table 1. Araucana versus Ameraucana.
Characteristic
Araucana
Ameraucana
Tail
no
yes
Ear-tufts
yes
no
Beard
no
yes
Muffs
no
yes
Blue eggs
yes
yes

The Ameraucana Breeders Club defines an Easter Egg chicken or Easter Egger as any chicken that possesses the blue egg gene, but doesn’t fully meet any breed descriptions as defined in the APA and/or ABA standards. Further, even if a bird meets an Ameraucana standard breed description, but doesn’t meet a variety description or breed true at least 50 of the time it is considered an Easter Egg chicken. http://www.ameraucana.org/faq.html#ONE

dreamrequest said...

Sorry, these are not "Auracan" chickens. Please read the following from the Dept. of Animal Science, Okla S. U. "These fowls were discovered in South America. A few were brought to the U.S. but have been crossed with other chickens so much so that characteristics of size, shape, etc., were dispersed. The trait of laying blue or greenish eggs persisted and now breeders are attempting to standardize the physical makeup of the population and gain them recognition as a breed. Some of the Araucanas were rumpless and possessed some interesting ear tufts. Probably at some time in the future, these fowls will be developed into an interesting breed with both economic and ornamental attributes." http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/poultry/

It is not uncommon for another breed, the Ameraucana, to be mistaken for an Araucana. The Ameraucana was developed in the United States in the 1970s in an effort to retain blue egg color in a larger, tailed chicken. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PS013

Table 1. Araucana versus Ameraucana.
Characteristic
Araucana
Ameraucana
Tail
no
yes
Ear-tufts
yes
no
Beard
no
yes
Muffs
no
yes
Blue eggs
yes
yes

The Ameraucana Breeders Club defines an Easter Egg chicken or Easter Egger as any chicken that possesses the blue egg gene, but doesn’t fully meet any breed descriptions as defined in the APA and/or ABA standards. Further, even if a bird meets an Ameraucana standard breed description, but doesn’t meet a variety description or breed true at least 50 of the time it is considered an Easter Egg chicken. http://www.ameraucana.org/faq.html#ONE

happygardeningmama said...

Hi Dreamrequest,

You are absolutely correct that these are not *true* auracanas. That said--as a hobbyist with a home based business selling affordable healthy eggs, we don't concern ourselves with the particulars of pedigree with our flock. We accept that the chicks sold at feed stores and most mail-order suppliers are not true to breed--and expect that to some degree the other "breeds" may not be true to breed either. (Such as the black sex link we had that turned out to be a roo who never displayed the tell tale "signs" of a female in chickhood!)

Thank you for sharing your information and link!

happygardeningmama said...

Shoot typed that incorrectly--this is what I was trying to say about the black sex link roo--typically in chicks, the female has a white mark on her head that indicates she is female, and the male does not (or could be other way around), which is a breed specific trait for the hybrid black sex link. We had a roo who displayed all markings for a female--so much for true to breed!

I think if folks are very interested in ensuring accuracy of their poultry breeds they would be wise to consult with breeders recognized by the various breed-specific national organizations.